• Wed. Feb 28th, 2024

A step forward towards nuclear energy in Burundi

ByWebmaster

Feb 12, 2024

GITEGA, February 12th (ABP) – Burundian Senators meeting in plenary assembly, on Thursday February 8, 2024, in their hemicycle in Gitega (center of the country), unanimously passed the bill on ratification by the Republic of Burundi of the agreement between the Government of the Republic of Burundi and the Government of the Russian Federation on cooperation in the field of using nuclear energy for peaceful purposes, signed on July 27, 2023, in Sant-Petersburg.

The Burundian government sent the minister responsible for energy and mines, Mr. Ibrahim Uwizeye, to explain to the Senators the underlying reasons leading to the drawing up of the said bill.

In that perspective, Minister Uwizeye indicated that Burundi’s objective is to limit its energy dependence by producing its own source of sustainable energy thanks to this cooperation with the Russian Federation which, due to its expertise in this energy sector, is well placed to meet Burundi’s expectations, he said.

In terms of debates, the Senators wanted to know if Burundi is up to the task of effectively managing this type of energy. Minister Uwizeye responded in the affirmative way. He indicated that the country has already put in place a legal framework relating to this, adding that Burundi will soon have human resources trained in nuclear science and technology.

As for the priorities of Burundi’s nuclear program, Mr. Uwizeye indicated that the needs are manifested in agriculture for the multiplication of very productive and disease-resistant seeds, the conservation of the harvest for its export or subsequent use.

In the field of health, nuclear energy will be useful for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. In the environment, the same energy will contribute to the detection of polluting elements. Nuclear energy will also help in livestock, said Minister Uwizeye, specifying that there will be the multiplication of disease-resistant breeds and the fight against cross-border zoonotic diseases, to name but a few.