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The public investment program (PIP) was one of the items on the agenda of the Cabinet Meeting held December 22

ByWebmaster

Dec 28, 2021

BUJUMBURA December 28th (ABP) – The Cabinet met on Wednesday December 22, 2021 in Bujumbura, under the chairmanship of the Head of State, Major General Evariste Ndayishimiye, to analyze several files.

The Cabinet analyzed in particular the Public Investment Program (PIP) 2022-2025, presented by the Minister of Finance, Budget and Economic Planning.

In order to meet the socioeconomic needs of the population, Burundi has put in place a range of planning instruments serving as a reference and orientation for any intervention by the State or by the technical and financial partner. This concerns in particular the National Development Plan 2018-2027 and its priority action plan 2018-2022. The PIP constitutes all the projects and programs submitted by the various ministries as a milestone for the implementation of the PND 2018-2022. It is made up of two major categories namely:

Projects in progress for which funding is available or assured, projects for which funding has yet to be mobilized.

For this, each ministry is called upon to prepare a work plan and an annual budget for the projects registered in the first year of the PIP.

The work plan should show the activities planned under the project for the year in question, the expected results, as well as the objectively verifiable indicators.

The total cost of the 2022-2025 PIP is estimated at 6553.55 billion BIF of which 24.98% will be made up of domestic resources, 30.43% of resources coming from outside. This implies that the Government will have to think of other financing mechanisms aimed at mobilizing resources to cover the financial gap estimated at 44.59%.

Following the analysis of that document, the Cabinet passed it with the following observations and recommendations:

Projects with funding must be identified in the ministries in order to align them with the priority projects, all projects with budgets or whose studies are ready must appear in the PIP, the ministries must ensure that all the projects registered in the first year are fully implemented.

In addition, all the actors must contribute in order to reduce the so high gap observed, the projects carried out by the NGOs should also appear in the PIP, it is necessary to draw up the annual action plans and to ensure that the communal hospitals meet the standards required, the ministries must make available at all times the project studies to be presented to the financial partners;

The Cabinet also studied the Draft Joint Ministerial Ordinance amending Ministerial Ordinance No 770/2148 / CAB / 2017 of October 3, 2017 regulating the imports, marketing and distribution of hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFC) and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), presented by the Minister of Environment, Agriculture and Livestock.

The Montreal Protocol is an agreement signed in 1987 by all countries for the implementation of the Vienna Framework Convention signed in 1985 for the phasing out of substances that deplete the ozone layer. It had five amendments for better implementation.

In its provisions, that Protocol states that the parties shall endeavor to ensure that the use of substances that deplete the ozone layer is limited to uses for which there is no other substance better suited to the environment.

The substances regulated by the Montreal Protocol are chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) used in refrigeration, air conditioning and agriculture.

To implement the various obligations arising from these instruments for the protection of the ozone layer, with regard to Burundi, Ministerial Ordinance No 770/2148 / CAB / 2017 of October 3, 2017 regulating imports, the marketing and distribution of hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) has been set up.

However, the ordinance contains shortcomings which do not allow all the obligations arising from those instruments to be taken into account, in particular:

The lack of precision in the procedures for requesting and granting import quotas for substances that deplete the ozone layer, the absence of control mechanisms to facilitate the monitoring of substances that deplete the ozone layer, the conditions for use of ozone-depleting substances, transport and transit of ozone-depleting substances, signatures of ministerial authorities involved in the management and control of ozone-depleting substances.

That bill corrects those shortcomings. After analyzing that bill, the Cabinet passed it with the recommendation to write the name and surname of the current Minister in charge of Trade.